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Sir thomas more hand d

Serious study of Shakespeare's handwriting began in the 18th century with scholars Edmond Malone and George Steevens. By the late nineteenth century paleographers began to make detailed study of the evidence in the hope of identifying Shakespeare's handwriting in other surviving documents. In those cases when the actual handwriting is not extant, the study of the published texts has yielded indirect evidence of his handwriting quirks through reading and apparent misreadings by compositors. To give one example of this, in the early published versions of Shakespeare’s plays there occurs a recurrence of an upper case letter “C” when the lower case is called for. This might indicate that Shakespeare was fond of such a usage in his handwriting, and that the compositors (working from the handwriting) followed the usage. When trying to determine who the author is of either a printed work or a pen-and-ink manuscript, this is one possible method of discovering such indications.[https://archive.org/stream/shakespeareshand00polluoft#page/112/mode/2up] Pollard, Alfred, editor. ''Shakespeare’s Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More''. Wison, J. Dover. “Bibliographical Links Between the Three Pages and the Good Quartos”. page 67 - 70. Cambridge University Press (1923)
Serious study of Shakespeare's handwriting began in the 18th century with scholars Edmond Malone and George Steevens. By the late nineteenth century paleographers began to make detailed study of the evidence in the hope of identifying Shakespeare's handwriting in other surviving documents. In those cases when the actual handwriting is not extant, the study of the published texts has yielded indirect evidence of his handwriting quirks through reading and apparent misreadings by compositors. To give one example of this, in the early published versions of Shakespeare’s plays there occurs a recurrence of an upper case letter “C” when the lower case is called for. This might indicate that Shakespeare was fond of such a usage in his handwriting, and that the compositors (working from the handwriting) followed the usage. When trying to determine who the author is of either a printed work or a pen-and-ink manuscript, this is one possible method of discovering such indications.[https://archive.org/stream/shakespeareshand00polluoft#page/112/mode/2up] Pollard, Alfred, editor. ''Shakespeare’s Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More''. Wison, J. Dover. “Bibliographical Links Between the Three Pages and the Good Quartos”. page 67 - 70. Cambridge University Press (1923)
Serious study of Shakespeare's handwriting began in the 18th century with scholars Edmond Malone and George Steevens. By the late nineteenth century paleographers began to make detailed study of the evidence in the hope of identifying Shakespeare's handwriting in other surviving documents. In those cases when the actual handwriting is not extant, the study of the published texts has yielded indirect evidence of his handwriting quirks through reading and apparent misreadings by compositors. To give one example of this, in the early published versions of Shakespeare’s plays there occurs a recurrence of an upper case letter “C” when the lower case is called for. This might indicate that Shakespeare was fond of such a usage in his handwriting, and that the compositors (working from the handwriting) followed the usage. When trying to determine who the author is of either a printed work or a pen-and-ink manuscript, this is one possible method of discovering such indications.[https://archive.org/stream/shakespeareshand00polluoft#page/112/mode/2up] Pollard, Alfred, editor. ''Shakespeare’s Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More''. Wison, J. Dover. “Bibliographical Links Between the Three Pages and the Good Quartos”. page 67 - 70. Cambridge University Press (1923)
Serious study of Shakespeare's handwriting began in the 18th century with scholars Edmond Malone and George Steevens. By the late nineteenth century paleographers began to make detailed study of the evidence in the hope of identifying Shakespeare's handwriting in other surviving documents. In those cases when the actual handwriting is not extant, the study of the published texts has yielded indirect evidence of his handwriting quirks through reading and apparent misreadings by compositors. To give one example of this, in the early published versions of Shakespeare’s plays there occurs a recurrence of an upper case letter “C” when the lower case is called for. This might indicate that Shakespeare was fond of such a usage in his handwriting, and that the compositors (working from the handwriting) followed the usage. When trying to determine who the author is of either a printed work or a pen-and-ink manuscript, this is one possible method of discovering such indications.[https://archive.org/stream/shakespeareshand00polluoft#page/112/mode/2up] Pollard, Alfred, editor. ''Shakespeare’s Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More''. Wison, J. Dover. “Bibliographical Links Between the Three Pages and the Good Quartos”. page 67 - 70. Cambridge University Press (1923)

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Greg D'arcy

text from https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Shakespeare%27s_handwriting Mark-up > [[Edmond Malone]] [[George Steevens]] [[paleography|paleographers]]